South Asia

Pakistan's Former President Asif Ali Zardari Arrested on Corruption Charges

Zardari, the widower of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto, was arrested by the National Accountability Bureau (NAB), the anti-corruption body's spokesman, Nawazish Ali, said.

Islamabad: Former Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari was arrested on corruption charges on Monday in a blow to the opposition Pakistan Peoples Party over what media said was an investigation into false bank accounts and money laundering.

Zardari, the widower of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto, was arrested by the National Accountability Bureau (NAB), the anti-corruption body’s spokesman, Nawazish Ali, said.

Local media channels said NAB arrested Zardari over its investigation into bank accounts and money laundering, with Zardari’s sister, Faryal Talpur, also being investigated.

The former president and Talpur could not be reached for comment but they have always denied any wrongdoing linked to those cases and the PPP says the cases are politically motivated.

“The government has no role in (the arrest),” interior minister Ejaz Shah told parliament, saying it was a court decision.

“This is done by NAB. Our government has nothing to do with it.”

Zardari spent 11 years in jail on corruption and murder charges before becoming president in 2008. But he was never convicted and denies any wrongdoing.

After his arrest on Monday, Zardari was seen leaving his house in Islamabad with his son, Bilawal Bhutto Zardari, the current leader of the PPP in which Zardari still wields vast influence.

During Zardari’s departure, PPP supporters chanted “Long live Bhutto”, in reference to one of South Asia’s most famed political dynasties that has ruled Pakistan on several occasions over the past five decades.

A former businessman and a polo-playing playboy in his younger days, Zardari swept to power in 2008 following a wave of sympathy following the murder of his wife, Benazir, a two-time premier, by Islamist militants in a suicide attack.

(Reuters)

Join The Discussion