World

In Challenge to Trump, Women Protesters Swarm Streets Across US

Protesters participating in the Women's March on Washington move up 17th Street Northwest after U.S. President Donald Trump's motorcade returned to the White House in Washington January 21, 2017. REUTERS/James Lawler Duggan

Protesters participating in the Women’s March on Washington move up 17th Street Northwest after US President Donald Trump’s motorcade returned to the White House in Washington January 21, 2017. Credit: Reuters/James Lawler Duggan

Washington: Hundreds of thousands of women, many with husbands, boyfriends and children in tow, filled the streets of several major US cities on Saturday in an unprecedented wave of mass protests against President Donald Trump the day after his inauguration.

Women activists, galvanised by Trump campaign rhetoric and behaviour they found to be especially misogynistic, spearheaded scores of US marches and sympathy rallies around the world that organisers said drew nearly five million protesters in all.

The demonstrations, far surpassing crowd expectations, highlighted strong discontent over Trump’s comments and policy positions toward a wide range of groups, including Mexican immigrants, Muslims, the disabled and environmentalists.

People participate in the Women's March on Washington, following the inauguration of U.S. President Donald Trump, in Washington, D.C., U.S., January 21, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

People participate in the Women’s March on Washington, following the inauguration of US President Donald Trump. Credit: Reuters/Lucy Nicholson

The planned centerpiece of the protests, a Women’s March on Washington, appeared to draw larger crowds than turned out a day earlier to witness Trump’s swearing-in on the steps of the US Capitol.

No official estimates of the turnout were available, but it clearly exceeded the 200,000 marchers projected in advance by organisers, filling long stretches of downtown Washington around the White House and the National Mall.

Many wore knitted pink cat-eared “pussy hats,” an appropriated reference to Trump’s boast in a 2005 video made public weeks before the election about grabbing womens’ genitals.

People gather for the Women's March in Washington U.S., January 21, 2017. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton

People gather for the Women’s March in Washington US, January 21, 2017. Credit: Reuters/Shannon Stapleton

Hundreds of thousands more women thronged New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Denver and Boston, adding to a public outpouring of mass dissent against Trump unmatched in modern US politics for a new president’s first full day in office.

So-called Sister March organisers estimated 750,000 demonstrators swarmed the streets of Los Angeles, one of the largest of Saturday’s gatherings. Police said the turnout there was as big or bigger than a 2006 pro-immigration march that drew 500,000.

Some 400,000 marchers assembled in New York City, according to Mayor Bill de Blasio, though organisers put the number there at 600,000.

The Chicago event grew so large that organisers staged a rally rather than trying to parade through the city. Police said more than 125,000 people attended there; sponsors estimated the crowd at 200,000.

The protests, mostly peaceful, illustrated the depth of division in the country, still reeling from the bitterly fought 2016 election campaign. Trump stunned the world by defeating Democrat Hillary Clinton, a former secretary of state and first lady who made history as the first woman nominated for president by a major US political party.

Pam Foyster, a resident of Ridgway, Colorado, said the atmosphere in Washington reminded her of mass protests during the 1960s and ’70s against the Vietnam War and in favour of civil rights and women’s rights.

“I’m 58 years old, and I can’t believe we are having to do this again,” Foyster said.

People participate in the Women's March on Washington, following the inauguration of U.S. President Donald Trump, in Washington, D.C., U.S., January 21, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson

People participate in the Women’s March on Washington. Credit: Reuters/Lucy Nicholson

Although Republicans now control the White House and both houses of Congress, Trump faces entrenched opposition from wide segments of the public, in contrast with the honeymoon period new presidents typically experience when first taking office.

A recent ABC News/Washington Post poll found Trump had the lowest favourability rating of any incoming US president since the 1970s.

Around the world

Women-led protests against Trump, who has vowed that US policy would be based on the principle of “America first,” also were staged in Sydney, London, Tokyo and other cities across Europe and Asia.

Sister March sponsors boasted some 670 gatherings around the world in solidarity with the Washington event, estimating a global turnout of more than 4.6 million participants, although those numbers could not be independently verified.

Trump, in a Twitter post on Saturday, wrote, “I am honored to serve you, the great American People, as your 45th president of the United States!”

Attending an interfaith service at Washington National Cathedral before visiting the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) headquarters, Trump made no mention of the protests.

But he angrily attacked media reports, including photos, showing that crowds at Friday’s inaugural were smaller than those seen in 2009 and 2013, when Barack Obama took the oath of office for his first and second terms as president.

“I made a speech, I looked out, the field was, it looked like a million, million and a half people,” Trump said at his visit to the CIA. “They showed a field where there were practically nobody standing there.”

Saturday’s march in Washington overwhelmed the city’s metro subway system, with enormous crowds reported and some stations temporarily forced to turn away riders.

The Metro reported 275,000 rides as of 11 am (1600 GMT) Saturday, 82,000 more than the 193,000 reported at the same time on Friday, Inauguration Day, and eight times normal Saturday volume.

A woman activist holding a placard is seen on a Metrorail as they make their way to the Women's March in opposition to the agenda and rhetoric of President Donald Trump in Washington, D.C., U.S. on January 21, 2017. REUTERS/Adrees Latif

A woman activist holding a placard is seen on a Metrorail as they make their way to the Women’s March. Credit: Reuters/Adrees Latif

The peaceful atmosphere of Saturday’s march contrasted sharply with unrest the day before, when groups of black-clad anti-establishment activists, among hundreds of anti-Trump protesters, smashed windows, set vehicles on fire and fought with riot police, who responded with stun grenades.

Washington prosecutors on Saturday said about $100,000 in damage had been done and 230 adults and five minors had been arrested.

Saturday’s march featured speakers, celebrity appearances and a protest walk along the National Mall.

Among the well-known figures who attended were pop star Madonna, singer-actress Cher and former US secretary of state John Kerry.

Madonna performs at the Women's March in Washington U.S., January 21, 2017. REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton

Madonna performs at the Women’s March in Washington. Credit:Reuters/Shannon Stapleton

Women’s votes

Clinton won the popular vote in the November 8 presidential election by around 2.9 million votes and exceeded Trump’s support among women voters by more than 10% points. Trump, however, easily prevailed in the state-by-state electoral college vote that actually determines the outcome of the race.

Trump offered few if any olive branches to his opponents in his Friday inauguration speech.

“He has never seemed particularly concerned about people who oppose him, he almost fights against them instinctively,” said Neil Levesque, executive director of the New Hampshire Institute of Politics at Saint Anselm College.

But the lawmakers whom Trump will rely on to achieve his policy goals, including building a wall on the Mexican border and replacing the 2010 healthcare reform law known as Obamacare, may be more susceptible to negative public opinion the anti-Trump rallies illustrates, Levesque said.

“Members of congress are very sensitive to the public mood, and many of them are down here this week to see him,” Levesque said.

At the New York march, 42-year-old Megan Schulz, who works in communications, said she worried that Trump was changing the standards of public discourse.

“The scary thing about Donald Trump is that now all the Republicans are acquiescing to him and things are starting to become normalised,” Schulz said. “We can’t have our president talking about women the way he does.”

(Reuters)